thisistheverge:

You might also like this story about weaponized clickbait Reading news online over the past year, I came to realize that more or less every story now includes a beautiful woman. Tucked into modules with names like “around the web” or “you might like,” there she is, demonstrating her bosom or backside or pearly-white smile. Often she is a celebrity, talking about weight loss, filing a lawsuit, or collapsing onstage. Other times she is a fitness guru, or a fashion expert, or (in at least one case) a “former pole vaulter” who is “still smoking HOT.” The women of “Around the Web” are ubiquitous, they are alluring, and they only want one thing — your click.

thisistheverge:

You might also like this story about weaponized clickbait
Reading news online over the past year, I came to realize that more or less every story now includes a beautiful woman. Tucked into modules with names like “around the web” or “you might like,” there she is, demonstrating her bosom or backside or pearly-white smile. Often she is a celebrity, talking about weight loss, filing a lawsuit, or collapsing onstage. Other times she is a fitness guru, or a fashion expert, or (in at least one case) a “former pole vaulter” who is “still smoking HOT.” The women of “Around the Web” are ubiquitous, they are alluring, and they only want one thing — your click.

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in case you missed it
designersofthings:

2013 Was A Banner Year for Crowdfunding Wearable Tech
Wearable tech and crowdfunding go hand-in-hand. Ever since Pebble literally “kickstarted” the wearable craze back in 2012 raising over $10 million dollars for its smartwatch, the wearable and crowdfunding space has never been the same. 
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designersofthings:

2013 Was A Banner Year for Crowdfunding Wearable Tech

Wearable tech and crowdfunding go hand-in-hand. Ever since Pebble literally “kickstarted” the wearable craze back in 2012 raising over $10 million dollars for its smartwatch, the wearable and crowdfunding space has never been the same. 

Read More

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technologywearable techin case you missed it
fastcompany:

Nike is reportedly laying off its Fuelband team to focus on fitness software, instead.

Nike will reportedly refocus its efforts on developing fitness software—Nike+, Nike+ Running, etc. And we’ve heard murmurs that Nike may be looking for a potential partner on the hardware side…
Can you say “iWatch”?

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fastcompany:

Nike is reportedly laying off its Fuelband team to focus on fitness software, instead.

Nike will reportedly refocus its efforts on developing fitness software—Nike+, Nike+ Running, etc. And we’ve heard murmurs that Nike may be looking for a potential partner on the hardware side…

Can you say “iWatch”?

Read More>

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in case you missed itwearablestechnology

The Future of Media Will Be Streamed ]

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entertainmentin case you missed it
popmech:

Google announced their smart contact lens a couple months ago – one that could measure glucose without the need to prick the skin, a huge boon for those with diabetes. Not the sort to pause and take a breath after a win like that, the mad scientists of Silicon Valley already have version 2.0 on deck at the patent office, and, like every good piece of wearable tech, it’s got a camera attached. This means that soon you could be snapping selfies in every reflective surface you walk by with just a whim and a blink. Or, better yet, you could take a picture of literally anything else. Of course, bear in mind these are just patents - it could be a little while before you’re trolling South Beach winking at every bikini you see.

Google Is Making Your Eyeball A Camera

popmech:

Google announced their smart contact lens a couple months ago – one that could measure glucose without the need to prick the skin, a huge boon for those with diabetes. Not the sort to pause and take a breath after a win like that, the mad scientists of Silicon Valley already have version 2.0 on deck at the patent office, and, like every good piece of wearable tech, it’s got a camera attached. This means that soon you could be snapping selfies in every reflective surface you walk by with just a whim and a blink. Or, better yet, you could take a picture of literally anything else. Of course, bear in mind these are just patents - it could be a little while before you’re trolling South Beach winking at every bikini you see.

Google Is Making Your Eyeball A Camera

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fastcompany:

HBO director of digital and social media Jim Marsh breaks down the Game of Thrones approach to social marketing and fan engagement.

HBO has managed to ride the wave of fans’ organic social interaction around the show by getting involved in the conversations, while also using creative campaigns to keep stoking the fire during and between seasons. 


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fastcompany:

HBO director of digital and social media Jim Marsh breaks down the Game of Thrones approach to social marketing and fan engagement.

HBO has managed to ride the wave of fans’ organic social interaction around the show by getting involved in the conversations, while also using creative campaigns to keep stoking the fire during and between seasons. 

image

Read More>

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EntertainmenttelevisionSocial mediain case you missed it

Instagram’s Golden Hour

image

It’s been a busy week for Instagram: it carried out its first big spam purge, plus another analytics firm announced it will start combing through the social network’s data for brands. And, of course, Joe Biden. Want to be a part of the picture? Act now, because tomorrow may be too late.

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instagramsocial mediabrandsthe takeaway

- That’s in reference to Intel’s sales and next big thing bet: the Internet of Things. It compares to a dip of 1% in PC chips and a drop of 61% in mobile chips sales. And. although IoT chips products represent only 4% of Intel’s sales, they have made their bet. (from: Intel dives into the Internet of Things, but still has a weak PC market to deal with)

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internet of thingstechnologyin case you missed it
tacanderson:

I’ve always been really good at predicting digital and cultural trends. So much so that I’ve made my living doing it for most of the last decade. But even I have my biases. I was such a music snob and loved owning music that I couldn’t imagine not ever buying albums. 
I remember back in 2005 I read this book, The Future of Music: Manifesto for the Digital Music Revolution and thinking the authors were completely insane. They were talking about paying for streaming music like a utility, that we’d quit “owning” music and stop buying albums and would instead pay monthly fees to access unlimited music. I thought it was the stupidest thing I’d ever heard. It turned out to be the biggest trend I’ve ever completely missed.
Streaming, an interactive report from Pitchfork, tells the next phase of the story.  

From YouTube, to Pandora, to Spotify, streaming music is piloting our listening habits in fascinating new ways that both upend old hierarchies and recall innovations of previous eras. Eric Harvey explores how these developments are affecting ideas of taste, access, and ownership today—and what this shift means for fans and artists alike—in our latest Cover Story.

tacanderson:

I’ve always been really good at predicting digital and cultural trends. So much so that I’ve made my living doing it for most of the last decade. But even I have my biases. I was such a music snob and loved owning music that I couldn’t imagine not ever buying albums. 

I remember back in 2005 I read this book, The Future of Music: Manifesto for the Digital Music Revolution and thinking the authors were completely insane. They were talking about paying for streaming music like a utility, that we’d quit “owning” music and stop buying albums and would instead pay monthly fees to access unlimited music. I thought it was the stupidest thing I’d ever heard. It turned out to be the biggest trend I’ve ever completely missed.

Streaming, an interactive report from Pitchfork, tells the next phase of the story.  

From YouTube, to Pandora, to Spotify, streaming music is piloting our listening habits in fascinating new ways that both upend old hierarchies and recall innovations of previous eras. Eric Harvey explores how these developments are affecting ideas of taste, access, and ownership today—and what this shift means for fans and artists alike—in our latest Cover Story.

Continue reading ]
entertainmentstreaming musicin case you missed it